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Wyoming Residence   Typology: MOUNTAIN

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Location
Jackson Hole, WY
Type
Single-Family Residential
Size
7,000 sq ft
Completed
2014
Photographer
David Agnello

Layered in Nature

Echoing the grandeur of the Teton Mountain Range whilst seamlessly inhabiting the adjacent grassland, the Wyoming Residence exhibits a conscientious marriage of form and material. The property’s zoning restrictions were artfully managed with careful assimilation into the natural landscape. The result is an inspired expression of fluid yet layered space that collaborates with the surrounding beauty.

The driveway entrance introduces the stately side of the home, displaying clean lines made of concrete and Cor-Ten steel. These materials better with age and are utilized throughout to provide a maintenance-free environment the homeowner desired. From the entrance, the cantilevered structure wraps around to reveal a comparatively more modest side that bows to the mountains and floats on the meadow.

The client possessed a collection of art to be placed in the home, which was meticulously considered in the design process. Drywall was used exclusively and deliberately to hang the artwork to each piece’s necessary measurement. An art gallery was designed with low windows to allow natural light to permeate while protecting the sensitive art from harmful direct sunlight. It is these careful details that, in combination with the striking lineation of the home, create a harmonious alliance of function and design.

Once inside, natural light serves as an important material layered amongst its solid counterparts. Floor-to-ceiling windows unveil a view of the stunning exterior scenery. The living area is voluminous yet intimate. A built-in seating nook maintains a direct view of the mountains, unobstructed by a low profile fireplace. The minimal kitchen design is apportioned with tri-colored cabinets and a clever opening through that overlooks the gallery.

With consideration of the surrounding ski destinations, a utilitarian mudroom was constructed with functional details, such as a built-in ski boot warmer and ample storage.

 

For the Wyoming Residence, the homeowner’s desire for an energy efficient vacation home requiring little maintenance dovetailed perfectly into the fire-safety requirements for Jackson Hole. Based on the homes location in former “wildlands”, additional protections were needed to counteract wildfires which can reach peak temperatures within seconds. All of this was accomplished without sacrificing home’s aesthetics.

 

These efforts are detailed in a new book by Boyce Thompson about “Domestic Architecture in the Era of Climate Change”.